Tuesday, January 04, 2011

2010's Busiest Seiyuus: Fujiwara, Miyukichi, Kugyu, Jun

Fujiwara Keiji
Which seiyuus appeared in the highest number of anime episodes in 2010? According to a list posted on 2channel, the list begins with Fujiwara Keiji (227 episodes), Sawashiro Miyuki (219), Kugimiya Rie (217), and Fukuyama Jun (211).

The only newish voice in the top ten is the suddenly ubiquitous Taketatsu Ayana. Yuuki Aoi was 12th.

I've been coming to appreciate Fujimura Ayumi's work more and more -- and so have producers: she is tenth in the list.

Sawashiro Miyuki
Hirano Aya, who is supposedly doing much less seiyuu work, actually did enough work to come 13th.

And it seems Sakurai Takahiro's transgressions (he was involved in plagiarizing a play) have been forgiven: he was the fifth-busiest seiyuu last year.

Counting episodes is a good way to judge a seiyuu's success, since anime seiyuus are normally paid by the episode, rather than by either the show or the word.

Here is a full list of the top twenty:


227 Fujiwara Keiji

219 Sawashiro Miyuki
217 Kugimiya Rie
211 Fukuyama Jun
195 Sakurai Takahiro

192 Taketatsu Ayana
187 Ono Daisuke
186 Okamoto Nobuhiko
185 Sawashiro Miyuki
185 Fujimura Ayumi

182 Hanazawa Kana
181 Yuuki Aoi
177 Hirano Aya
174 Nakamura Yuuichi
169 Sanpei Yuuko

164 Tomatsu Haruka
163 Toyosaki Aki
161 Koyasu Takehito
159 Kakihara Tetsuya
152 Yoshino Hiroyuki

I can't vouch for the complete accuracy of the list, but the numbers seem reasonable to me.

10 comments:

hyl said...

Ssawashiro is in the list twice o.o

skchai said...

I think the second Sawashiro listing is actually Kuwatani Natsuko. Here's the source; not sure if it's the same one Hashi used butotherwise the names seem to match. It includes continuing anime, and of course it's hard to take into account the size of the role.

For amime commencing 2010, it's:

1. Fukuyama Jun
2. Fujimura Ayumi
3. Hanazawa Kana
4. Taketatsu Ayana
5. Fujiwara Hiroshi
6. Sawashiro Miyuki
7. Kobayashi Yuu
8. Ono Daisuke
9. Toyosaki Aki
10. Okamoto Nobuhiko

On this list, Hirano Aya is way down, suggesting that it's her continuing roles (Dragonball Kai, etc.) that are keeping her ranked so high. Yuuki Aoi would place much higher if they put more weight on leading roles. Koshimizu Ami, Inoue Marina, Saito Chiwa, Nabatame Hitomi, Okiayu Ryuutaro, Taniyama Kishou are notable for how far down the list they fell in 2010, but Koshimizu and Inoue at least are making comebacks of sorts in 2011's first cour with leading roles.

skchai said...

Sorry, 4. should read Fujiwara Keiji. The kanji can be read more than one way, but shows how gappy my knowledge is . . .

Anonymous said...

Pretty sure the second Sawashiro is Kuwashima Houko.

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/桑島法子

lvlln said...

Wow, looks like Miyuki Sawashiro is really in her prime. The first major role I saw her in was Rozen Maiden, over 5 years old now, I think, and she's continued to be relevant and get big roles all this time. And without a singing career like some other long time VAs.

hashi said...

Apologies to all. That second Miyukichi is the result of a quick posting on the run. But it was listed in my source (Yuuki Aoi's 2ch thread) as Kuwashima Houko.

Good point from skchai about Hirano. Her episodes were in shows like Dragonball, Fairy Tail, Jewelpet. But she gets paid for all of them, lol.

Leading roles are nice, but they do tend to go to young seiyuus. I'll know Ao-chan is a star when she gets numerous secondary roles, lol.

hashi said...

Apologies to all. That second Miyukichi is the result of a quick posting on the run. But it was listed in my source (Yuuki Aoi's 2ch thread) as Kuwashima Houko.

Good stuff from skchai. The list starting in 2010, and the point about Hirano. Her episodes were in shows like Dragonball, Fairy Tail, Jewelpet. But she gets paid for all of them, lol.

Leading roles are nice, but they do tend to go to young seiyuus. I'll know Ao-chan is a star when she gets numerous secondary roles, lol.

skchai said...

Thanks, Hashi.

Hashi and Anonymous are right; it is Kuwashima Houko at #9. Was rushing through the reading, or maybe it was wishful thinking. The other Kuwa-chan does not even seem to be on either list of ~300 - very depressing.

Also, I gave the wrong link for roles that began in 2010. Here's the right one.

As atonement, for folks who don't want to bother with the kanji, here's the 11-20 for anime commencing 2010 (and I proofread this time):

11. Sakurai Takahiro
12. Hikasa Youko
13. Asumi Kana
14. Itou Shizuka
15. Takagaki Ayahi
16. Suwabe Junichi
17. Kanemitsu Nobuaki
18. Yuuki Aoi
19. Ishii Kouji
20. Tomatsu Haruka


Kanemitsu and Ishii are the kind of seiyuu who tend to rack up a lot of minor roles, so their ranking might be inflated a bit, but respect to them for keeping at it despite the fact that they aren't getting the starring vehicles.

skchai said...

I would slightly differ with Hashi (let me know if you don't like to be called that BTW) on the point about young seiyuu and leading roles, though it could just be matter of what type of anime we're talking about. It's true they dominate leading roles in series aimed at hard-core anime aficionados, i.e. we otaku, but not so much for shows that air when normal people are awake.

The extreme case is 70+ year-old Nozawa Masako still playing Goku on Dragonball Kai. It is true that leading roles for older seiyuu in long-running mainstream anime tend to be women playing boys' roles. For a Tanaka Mayumi or Takeuchi Junko, nonetheless, it's a gold mine, since they can live off of playing Luffy or Naruto for years and years.

Likewise for Yajima Akiko (Shin-chan), but in her case it's a big loss artistically when unquestionably one of the greatest seiyuu ever settles into a comfortable role and only ventures out now and then to show her incredible talent and versatility. I'm grateful whenever she does, whether it's Angela in Kuroshitsuji, Komagusu Miyako in Shinreigari/Ghost Hound, Himekawa Ayumi in Glass no Kamen, Kamogawa Asumi in Futasu no Spica, Dorothy Wainwright in The Big O, Shiina Tsubasa in Figure 17 . . . Even "Boku no Koe" in Clannad ~ After Story was typical Yajima perfection IMHO. That may seem like a fair amount of roles, but it's over the course of more than 10 years. Sorry; I could go on and on about Yajima Akiko.

Takayama Minami is another fine, relatively older seiyuu who's ensconced in a long-term lead role (Conan) in mainstream anime, although I personally wouldn't put her in quite the same class as Yajima or Mitsuishi Kotono. Kotochawan's relegation these days to mostly bits-and-pieces roles, even without a weekly Shin-chan role to hold her down, is particularly unfortunate and puzzling.

Hayashibara Megumi could, one would think, get a leading role in mainstream anime if she really wanted (esp. if she's willing to play a boy), but she seems content to pick and choose.

Back on topic: Yajima and Mitsuishi both seem to be ranked at about #200 for new and continuing anime and, not surprisingly, absent from the list for new anime. As mentioned, however, Yajima's roles are bigger. Surprisingly, Hayashibara is ranked much higher, with 92 appearances, although all I remember is Pokemon and the narration on Rainbow (should that count?). The huge success of the Evangelion 2.x reboots were of course very nice for Megumi and Kotono, even though they don't count on the list.

Speaking of Rainbow, even a non-seiyuu like the now-officially-known-as Lecherous Oguri Shun makes the list. So do the Smileage girls.

Poor Kuwatani Natsuko.

TsukimoriKahoko said...

I know Taniyama Kisho has been super busy on tour as Granrodeo all over Japan for much of 2010, and now into 2011 as well, so that accounts for his lessening of anime roles last year. In May 2010, Granrodeo performed at the Nippon Budokan--a huge feat showing how popular they are, as the Budokan is reserved for only super popular groups/singers and big time foreign bands/singers (the Beatles performed here, Frank Sinatra, Celine Dion, Christina Aguilera, etc, etc, just to name a few.) Also the Emperor and his wife attend a WWII ceremony each year there. So it's a really big deal to play there. This made Kiyan the first and so far, only, male seiyuu ever to perform at the Nippon Budokan for his own concert.